Japanese Swiss Roll with Mixed berries and whipped cream Filling

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Hello lovely people who love food!

Anybody having a case of the Mondays? Yep, me too. For all the people with the opposite time zone with mine, you are reading this on Sunday evening so I hope this helps with your Sunday night syndrome. What am I babbling about? I don’t know. Absolutely no idea. Obviously the case of the Monday talking… I just need to write stuff down, even if it’s nonsense. Do you ever feel that way?

Anyway, today I will be sharing with you guys a recipe to a delicious Japanese Swiss Roll. It is called both Japanese and Swiss because the original cake roll shape is apparently credited to the Swiss, so it is called Swiss roll, and the Japanese part is due to the fact that the sponge recipe is a Japanese recipe 🙂 And it is amazing!!

Here is some information about Japanese sponge cake that I have taken from Japanese Cooking 101:

We have mainly two kinds of sweets in Japan: Japanese-style (Wagashi) and Western-style (Yogashi). And even though we call it roughly “Western”,  modern Western-style cakes and pastries are heavily and almost exclusively influenced by French desserts […]

Just like French sponge cakes called génoise, this recipe doesn’t have any leavenings such as baking powder.  The batter rises in the oven because of well beaten eggs.  Sponge cakes are a little drier than some other cakes which can be eaten by themselves, like chiffon cakes. However, sponge cakes are supposed to be assembled with syrup and cream and can absorb moisture from these other components.

This particular recipe for the sponge cake that I am using today is fully credited to Savoury Days blog, so here we go:

Ingredients:

For the cake batter:

  • 4 large eggs  – room temperature
  • 20 gram sugar
  • 40 ml whole milk
  • 40 gram vegetable oil
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 30 gram all-purpose flour
  • 30 gram corn starch
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 3/8 tsp cream of tartar –
  • 60 gram extra sugar – sifted

For the Filling:

  • 125 ml cream 35 – 40% fat
  • 20 gram sugar
  • 1.5 cup mixed berries (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries)
  • 40 gram sugar

Method:

Making the Cake Batter:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 170 degree celsius
  2. Separate the egg yolks and egg whites
  3. Put the egg yolks and 20 gram sugar in a mixing bowl and whip the mixture until the sugar is dissolved and becomes brighter
  4. Pour in the milk, vegetable oil and vanilla extract into the egg yolk mixture and mix until incorporated
  5. Sift the all-purpose flour and the corn starch into the mixture and mix until smooth. Set the mixture aside.
  6. Put the egg whites into another mixing bowl with a pinch of salt. Whip the egg white on high speed with a hand mixer until you see big bubbles like bath soap.
  7. Stop the mixer and put in the cream of tartar and continue whipping the egg whites on high speed until the whites appear glossy. Then, reduce the speed to medium high and continue to whip until the whites have stiff peaks.
  8. Take a third of the beaten eggwhites and use a whisk to gently whisk it into the egg yolk mixture. This will soften the eggyolk mixture so it will be easier to fold the rest of the egg whites in later.
  9. Take a spatula and fold the eggwhites into the eggyolk mixture, one-third after another. After the fold, the whole mixture should be smooth, without big air bubbles and definitely not runny. It should feel airy and light.

Bake the Cake:

  1. Line the rectangular baking pan with parchment paper and secure with a smear of butter at the corners. You can cut the corners of the paper so it lines the pan better.
  2. Transfer the cake batter to the baking pan. Tap the pan on to the kitchen counters about 5 hard times to get rid of the big air bubbles.
  3. Bake the cake at 170 degree celsius for 35 minutes until the surface of the cake turns to a light golden brown and you can test the doneness of the cake by gently poking the cake and see that it bounces back.
  4. Take the cake that is attached to the parchment paper out of the pan. Peel away the paper from the sides of the cake. Take a clean kitchen towel and cover the cake. Take a drying rack and invert the cake on to the rack. The towel should be between the cake and the rack now.
  5. Peel away the parchment paper completely and let the cake cool completely to room temperature.

Prepare the Filling:

  1. Meanwhile, prepare the cream by whipping it in a bowl with sugar until you have stiff peaks. Stop there and not mix more as you will be making butter. 🙂 Put the whipped cream in the fridge for 30 minutes
  2. Mix the berries well with 40 gram sugar and put in to the fridge as well

Rolling the Cake:

  1. Once the cake has cooled. Cut off t he edges of the cake.
  2. Line a sheet of aluminum foil larger than the cake on a cutting board or kitchen counter.
  3. Invert the cake onto the aluminum foil so that the brown surfact is on top
  4. Spread the whipped cream on top of the cake and leave about 7 cm at the end of the cake (so the filling doesn’t over flow and make a mess)
  5. Strain the mixed berries of excess juice then scatter them on top of the whipped cream layer
  6. Roll the cake tightly using the aluminum foil
  7. Once the cake has been rolled up, wrap it in food film a little tightly and put the cake roll in the fridge to chill for about 3 hours. Trust me, it tastes way better cool.
  8. Slice the cake and enjoy with a cup of tea!

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    Thanks for reading, you guys! Have a wonderful day!

Love,

Chinou

xoxo

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