Vietnamese Sweet Sticky Rice Balls./.Bánh trôi

DSC02925

(Các bạn muốn đọc tiếng Việt vui lòng kéo xuống dưới nha 🙂 ) ❤

Hello lovely people who like to read about cooking! 😀 How are we doing today?

Today I will be writing about a dessert dish called “bánh trôi”. It is a dessert dish popular in Vietnam and China, and possibly has a Chinese origin. The people in the North of Vietnam are accustomed to making this dessert to be eaten cold on a lunar calendar festival called “Cold Food Festival”, or in Vietnamese: “Tết Hàn Thực” which takes place annually on the 3rd of March according to the lunar calendar (which is approximately sometime beginning of April according to the Gregorian calendar).

The myth behind this dessert has many variations, but the most notable one comes from China and goes like this, I will quote from Wikipedia:

During the Spring and Autumn period, Prince Chong’er of the state of Jin endured many hardships while he was exiled from his home state because of the Li Ji Unrest. While heading towards the Beidi, only 15 men accompanied him, one being his friend and subject Jie Zitui (介子推; or Jie Zhitui 介之推). Jie Zitui was the only one who followed the prince through his 19 years of hardships, seeing his final ascension to the throne as Duke Wen of Jin.

Once, when Chong’er and Jie Zitui passed through the State of Wey, all their provisions were stolen. In order to help the prince who was tormented by hunger, Jie Zitui cut off the flesh from his thigh and offered it to the prince for sustenance.

Later, when Chong’er became Duke Wen of Jin, he ordered a search for Jie Zitui who had gone into hiding in the remote mountains with his mother. Jie Zhitui had no political ambitions and felt ashamed to work with his hypocritical fellows, hence refused invitation of the Duke. Duke Wen ordered the mountains to be burned down in order to force Jie out of hiding. However, the fire ended up killing Jie and his mother.

Filled with remorse, Duke Wen ordered that each year during these three days the setting of fire is forbidden – all food was to be consumed cold. Therefore, the Festival is thus named. In the city of Jiexiu in Shanxi Province, where Jie died, locals still remember this tradition. But even for them the tradition of eating cold food is no longer practiced.

In Vietnam, where it is called Tết Hàn Thực, the Cold Food Festival is celebrated by Vietnamese people in the northern part of the country on the third day of the third lunar month, but only marginally. People cook glutinous rice balls called bánh trôi on that day but the holiday’s origins are largely forgotten, and the fire taboo is also largely ignored.

I had never made this dish before this past Saturday, and I thought I’d share it with you guys the recipe and the story behind the food. Plus, it used to be my favorite breakfast food once, so all the more reason to spread the knowledge!

So! Here we go:

DSC02860

The things you need are:

  • 110 gram palm sugar cube (You can substitute with brown sugar cube)

Palm sugar before cubed looks like this:

ptg00044292

  • Some roasted sesame seeds
  • Wet sticky rice dough: 500 gram

It might be difficult for you to find this kind of dough in a Western market, or even an Asian market in America or Europe, so the alternative is to make this dough on your own. The method is as below:

Ingredients for making the dough:                      

  • 500 gram sticky rice powder
  • 50 gram rice powder
  • 1 litre of water (you might not need to use all of it)

 

Method for making the dough:

Step 1: Mix the dry sticky rice and regular rice powder in a big bowl

Step 2:  Gradually pour the water into the bowl with the powder and stir until the powder is dissolved

Step 3: Leave the mixture to sit for 3 hours until it is split into two parts: the wet powder on the bottom of the bowl and the water on top.

Step 4: Take a clean thick kitchen towel, put the wet powder part from the dough inside the towel, tie the opening up tightly and hang the powder-filled towel above a pot or a bowl for the powder mixture to rid of excessive water.

Step 5: After 1 hour, open up the towel to check the dough. If it seems fine, wet enough without dripping, and non-stick to the hands then it is ready. If not, hang it to dry more and check periodically every 15 minutes until dough is ready.

 

Once you have made the dough:

Step 1: Pinch some dough from the dough mass (about 1 tbsp)

DSC02864

Step 2: Flatten the ball of dough and put one cube of sugar in the middle like so:

DSC02865

Step 3: Close the opening of the dough piece. Put the dough in the middle of your two palms and move your hands in a circular motion to form it into a ball like below:

DSC02867

DSC02868

DSC02869

Continue until 1/3 of the mass dough is gone. Put the rice balls on a cutting board to boil later.

 

 

DSC02881

DSC02890

Now, you can continue to go on forming all of the dough, or create different flavors and colors with the rest of the dough. Traditionally, Vietnamese people only do plain ones like above, but I want to have various flavors and colors to this dessert, so that brings us to the following optional steps:

Step 4: Flatten 1/3 of the dough mass (1/2 of the remaining dough)

DSC02892

Step 5: Put in 1 tbsp of cocoa powder

DSC02893

DSC02894

DSC02895

Step 6: Close it and  wedge the dough until the cocoa powder is completely incorporated with the rice dough:

Step 7: Continue to form rice balls like step 1 to 3.

The rest of the dough, I put in 1 tbsp of matcha powder, and so  my rice balls look like these:

DSC02909

Step 8: Put a big pot of water on high heat and wait until it’s boiled.

DSC02911

DSC02914

Step 9: Prepare a big bow of ice cold water to put the rice balls in after cooked so they don’t get mushy and the forms are preserved. Wow this picture is like freaking post-modern minimalism art hahaha. Can you see the little ice cubes?!

DSC02913

Step 10: OK! Let’s boil the rice balls now. Just go ahead and put them all in there. The rice balls will sink to the bottom of the pot. Once they are cooked, they will float on the surface of the boiling water, and you will want to scoop them out right then before they get too mushy, and put them in the bowl of ice cold water. This picture is so bad because the steam has gotten to my camera lens 😦

SONY DSC

DSC02916

Step 11: Take a spoon and scoop them out onto a plate:

DSC02921

Step 12: Sprinkle the roasted sesame seeds on top of the rice balls for taste and decoration, mostly so they don’t look like a bunch of gross frog eggs :((. And there you have it!!

DSC02925

DSC02926

DSC02928

Let them cool down a little so the outer skin is a bit chewy then eat it with a fork. The dough is completely plain, we do not put any sugar in it, so when you eat one whole ball, the dough is melted in with the taste of the palm sugar inside and create a balanced sweet taste with a hint of sesame flavor. The texture is chewy and sticky. You can store these rice balls for 2 days after covering them with food film or an inverted bowl. I love these little sticky rice balls! Ben doesn’t. He only likes Western dessert haha.

A big thanks to my nephew Vừng (which means sesame seed in English haha, it’s his nickname) for helping me take the pictures! He is only 5 years old! 😀

Here are some of the pics he took while I was making the dish:

DSC02877

DSC02879

DSC02851

Like always, thanks for reading and I hope you will try to make these one day. I hope you have enjoyed discovering the story behind this dish as well. I just love trivials like that. 😀

Happy cooking and happy eating everyone! ❤

Love,

Chinou!



DSC02926

Xin chào những con người đáng yêu thích đọc về thức ăn! 😀 Các bạn có khỏe không?

Hôm nay mình sẽ viết về bánh trôi. Người Việt Nam thì không lạ gì món bánh này nữa rồi nhưng có thể một số bạn không rõ nguồn gốc của ngày lễ Tết Hàn Thực mà chúng ta hay ăn món bánh này? Mình sẽ trích Wikipedia:

 

Tết Hàn Thực là một ngày tết vào ngày mồng 3 tháng 3 Âm lịch. “Hàn Thực” nghĩa là “thức ăn lạnh”. Ngày tết truyền thống này xuất hiện tại một số tỉnh của Trung Quốc, miền bắc Việt Nam và một số cộng đồng người gốc Hoa trên thế giới.

Hàng năm vào ngày này, nhiều gia đình cho xay bột, đồ đỗ xanh, làm bánh trôi, bánh chay, nấu xôi chè lễ Phật và cúng gia tiên, có lẽ đó cũng là một cách tưởng niệm người thân trong những ngày tháng cuối xuân, chứ ít người biết đến hai chữ “Hàn Thực” gắn với một điển tích ở Trung Quốc, được biết tới nhiều qua tiểu thuyết Đông Chu liệt quốc.

Đời Xuân Thu, vua Tấn Văn Công nước Tấn, gặp loạn phải bỏ nước lưu vong, nay trú nước Tề, mai trú nước Sở. Bấy giờ có một người hiền sĩ tên là Giới Tử Thôi, theo vua giúp đỡ mưu kế. Một hôm, trên đường lánh nạn, lương thực cạn, Giới Tử Thôi phải lén cắt một miếng thịt đùi mình nấu lên dâng vua. Vua ăn xong hỏi ra mới biết, đem lòng cám kích vô cùng. Giới Tử Thôi theo phò Tấn Văn Công trong mười chín năm trời, cùng nhau trải nếm bao nhiêu gian truân nguy hiểm. Về sau, Tấn Văn Công giành lại được ngôi báu trở về làm vua nước Tấn, phong thưởng rất hậu cho những người có công trong khi tòng vong, nhưng lại quên mất công lao của Giới Tử Thôi. Giới Tử Thôi cũng không oán giận gì, nghĩ mình làm được việc gì, cũng là cái nghĩa vụ của mình, chớ không có công lao gì đáng nói. Vì vậy về nhà đưa mẹ vào núi Điền Sơn ở ẩn. Tấn Văn Công về sau nhớ ra, cho người đi tìm. Giới Tử Thôi không chịu rời Điền Sơn ra lĩnh thưởng, Tấn Văn Công hạ lệnh đốt rừng, ý muốn thúc ép Giới Tử Thôi phải ra, nhưng ông nhất định không chịu tuân mệnh, rốt cục cả hai mẹ con ông đều chết cháy. Vua thương xót, lập miếu thờ và hạ lệnh trong dân gian phải kiêng đốt lửa ba ngày, chỉ ăn đồ ăn nguội đã nấu sẵn để tưởng niệm (khoảng từ mồng 3 tháng 3 đến mồng 5 tháng 3 Âm lịch hàng năm).

Ở Việt Nam cũng theo tục ấy và ăn Tết Hàn Thực ngày mồng 3 tháng 3. Tuy nhiên, người ta chỉ làm bánh trôi hay bánh chay để thế cho đồ lạnh, nhưng chỉ cúng gia tiên, và có ít liên hệ đến Giới Tử Thôi và những kiêng kỵ khác.

Mình chưa bao giờ làm bánh trôi cho đến Thứ Bảy tuần trước, và mình nghĩ có một blog về nấu ăn mà lại bỏ qua món ăn trong ngày lễ truyền thống để giới thiệu với bạn bè quốc tế thật là một thiếu sót, nên mình muốn viết về món bánh này. Hơn nữa, đây lại từng là món ăn sáng khoái khẩu của mình lúc học cấp I nên sao lại không giới thiệu nó được cơ chứ?!

Rồi! Làm thôi!

DSC02860

Những thứ bạn sẽ cần là:

  • 110 gram đường đỏ (đường thốt nốt)

Đường thốt nốt lúc chưa cắt ra trông như vậy nè:

ptg00044292

  • Một ít hạt vừng đã rang chín
  • Bột bánh trôi: 500 gram (có thể mua ở chợ ấy)

Nếu các bạn muốn làm bột từ đầu thì công thức như sau nhé:

Nguyên liệu làm bột bánh trôi:                      

  • 500 gram bột gạo nếp
  • 50 gram bột gạo tẻ
  • 1 lít nước lọc (có thể sẽ không dùng hết)

Các làm bột bánh trôi:

Bước 1: Trộn bột gạo nếp và bột gạo tẻ vào một bát to hoặc cái nồi

Bước 2: Từ từ đổ nước vào chỗ bột và khuấy đều lên.

Bước 3: Để hỗn hợp bột đó trong 3 tiếng đến khi tách thành 2 phần: bột lắng ở dưới và nước ở trên.

Bước 4: Lấy một chiếc khăn dày, gạn nước đi và vớt chỗ bột ướt cho vào khăn này, buộc túm khăn lại và treo lên. Để bên dưới là một chiếc bát hoặc nồi để bột róc nước xuống.

Bước 5: Sau 1 tiếng, mở khăn ra kiểm tra bột. Nếu bột mịn, đủ ướt mà không ướt quá, và không dính tay thì bột đã sẵn sàng rồi đấy! Nếu không thì bạn lại buộc khăn lại và treo lên để róc nước tiếp, kiểm tra 15 phút một lần đến khi bột sẵn sàng.

Sau khi đã làm xong bột bánh:

Bước 1: Nhéo một ít bột ra từ khối bột vừa làm (khoảng 1 tbsp)

DSC02864

Bước 2: Nhấn bẹt miếng bột ra và đặt viên đường vào trong:

DSC02865

Step 3: Đóng miếng bột có đường lại và nặn thành viên tròn như bên dưới:

DSC02867

DSC02868

DSC02869

Tiếp tục nặn thành từng viên đến khi 1/3 chỗ bột đã dùng xong. Để những viên bột đã nặn lên thớt hoặc đĩa để chờ luộc.

DSC02881

DSC02890

Bạn có thể chỉ làm bánh trôi trắng như vậy, hoặc để chừa 2/3 chỗ bột còn lại làm những vị và màu khác nhau. Như mình thì mình làm 1/3 trắng, 1/3 cacao, 1/3 trà xanh. 🙂

Nếu các bạn muốn làm vị ca cao và trà xanh như mình thì làm như sau:

Bước 4: Nhất dẹt 1/3 chỗ bột (1/2 chỗ còn lại)

DSC02892

Bước 5: Cho 1 thìa tbsp bột cacao vào giữa

DSC02893

DSC02894

DSC02895

Bước 6: Đóng bột vào và nặn đến khi chỗ bột cacao quyện hết vào bột thành một khối có màu nâu nhạt như vậy:

Bước 7: Tiếp tục nặn bột thành từng viên như bước 1 đến 3

Sau khi nặn xong, những viên bột của mình trông như thế này:

DSC02909

Bước 8: Đặt một nồi nước to lên bếp đun lửa to đến khi sôi:

DSC02911

DSC02914

Bước 9: Chuẩn bị một bát nước đá lạnh để sau khi bánh trôi luộc chín thì thả vào để bánh giữ được hình dáng và ăn không bị nhũn nhão nhoét. Ảnh này nhìn như tranh hậu hiện đại :))

DSC02913

Bước 10: Rồi, luộc bánh thôi! Nhớ Hồ Xuân Hương tí haha:

Thân em vừa trắng lại vừa tròn

ba chìm bảy nổi với nước non

Rắn nán mặc dầu tay kẻ nặn

Mà em vẫn giữ tấm lòng son

Khi vừa thả vào, bánh trôi sẽ chìm xuống đáy nồi. Khi nào bánh nổi lên trên mặt nước là đã chín, bạn hãy vớt ra ngay rồi cho vào bát nước lạnh nhé.

SONY DSC

DSC02916

Bước 11: Để khoảng 10 giây, sau đó bạn lấy thìa vớt bánh ra đĩa sạch như phía dưới nhé:

DSC02921

Bước 12: Rắc vừng lên trên bánh để có vị vừng và trang trí, cho đỡ giống một đống trứng ếch bùi nhùi hahaha. Thế là xong rồi đấy!

DSC02925

DSC02926

DSC02928

Để bánh nguội tí hãy ăn, khi mà phần vỏ ngoài hơi se lại chút, ăn dai dai, dẻo dẻo. Phần vỏ hoàn toàn không có đường, nên khi ăn vào nhân toàn đường sẽ cân bằng vị ngọt, thêm tí hương vị vừng càng ngon ngon heo heo.

Bạn có thể để đĩa bánh như này trong 2 ngày, tùy khí hậu, nếu trời nồm ẩm thì chắc đến chiều mai đã chua rồi ấy, nên cái này làm thì ăn trong ngày thôi là tốt nhất. Nếu phải để đến mai hoặc đến tối ăn thì cứ đậy lại bằng màng nylon hoặc lấy cái bát đậy lên kẻo kiến gián lại bò vào nhé. 😀

Vẫn như mọi khi, cảm ơn mọi người đã đọc bài và mình hy vọng các bạn sẽ tự làm bánh trôi ở nhà một ngày nào đó cho vui :D. Mình cũng hy vọng thông tin về Tết Hàn Thực bên trên có ích cho mọi người. Mình thích đọc những điển tích kiểu thế lắm.

Chúc mọi người nấu vui và ăn ngon nha!

Thân mến,

Chinou!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s